ProDG (Belgium)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
ProDG
Pro Deutschsprachige Gemeinschaft
LeaderClemens Scholzen[1]
Founded2008 (2008)
Merger ofPJU and PDB
HeadquartersKaperberg 6, 4700 Eupen
IdeologyChristian democracy[2][3]
Social liberalism[4][5][6]
Regionalism[2][7]
Political positionCentre[3][8] to centre-right[3]
European affiliationFUEN[9]
Parliament of the German-speaking Community
6 / 25
European Parliament (German-speaking seats)
0 / 1
Website
www.prodg.be

ProDG (German: Pro Deutschsprachige Gemeinschaft, lit.'Pro German-speaking Community') is a regionalist,[2][7] Christian-democratic[2] political party active in the German-speaking Community of Belgium. The party brings together politicians from the previous Party of German-speaking Belgians (PDB) and PJU parties. The party was formed in 2008 and first featured on the electoral ballot in 2009. Following the 2009 regional election, the party won four out of 25 seats in the Parliament and participated in the regional Government of the German-speaking Community of Belgium with two ministers.[10] In the 2014 regional election, the party won six seats and its leader Oliver Paasch became the new minister-president.[11]

The party was formerly a member of the European Free Alliance.[12]

Election results[edit]

German-speaking Community Parliament[edit]

Election year # of votes % of votes # of seats won +/- Notes
2009 6,553 17.5 (#4)
4 / 25
In a government coalition with SP & PFF
2014 8,352 22.2 (#2)
6 / 25
Increase 2 In a government coalition with SP & PFF
2019 9,146 23.3 (#1)
6 / 25
Steady 0 In a government coalition with SP & PFF

European Parliament[edit]

Results for the German-speaking electoral college.

Election year # of overall votes % of electoral
college vote
# of electoral
college seats won
+/- Notes
2009 3,897 10.1 (#5)
0 / 1
Steady 0
2014 5,106 13.2 (#5)
0 / 1
Steady 0
2019 5,360 13.2 (#3)
0 / 1
Steady 0

References[edit]

  1. ^ Prodg.be: Menschen bei ProDG
  2. ^ a b c d Nordsieck, Wolfram (2019). "German-speaking Community/Belgium". Parties and Elections in Europe.
  3. ^ a b c Emanuele Massetti; Arjan H Schakel. From class to region: How regionalist parties link (and subsume) left-right into centre-periphery politics (PDF). p. 869, 877.
  4. ^ "Paasch: «Moi, ultrarégionaliste? Alors, les autres partis le sont aussi!»". lesoir. 5 June 2014.
  5. ^ "Weg durch den Wahl-Dschungel in Belgien". VRT. 25 May 2004. Retrieved 2022-12-16.
  6. ^ "Zum Stand der Regierungsbildung in Belgien". Belgieninfo. 20 August 2019. Retrieved 2022-12-16.
  7. ^ a b Régis Dandoy; Arjan Schakel (19 November 2013). Regional and National Elections in Western Europe: Territoriality of the Vote in Thirteen Countries. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 54–. ISBN 978-1-137-02544-9.
  8. ^ Christoph Niessen; Min Reuchamps. DESIGNING A PERMANENT DELIBERATIVE CITIZENS’ ASSEMBLY – The Ostbelgien Modell in Belgium (PDF). Institute for Governance and Policy Analysis. p. 6.
  9. ^ FUEN Members: Regionalpartei ProDG.
  10. ^ flandersnews.be June 12, 2009, Coalition accord in German-speaking Belgium Archived June 18, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Paasch nieuwe minister-president van Duitstalige regering
  12. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-05-09.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

External links[edit]