Vivian Woodward

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Vivian Woodward
Vivian Woodward.jpg
Personal information
Full name Vivian John Woodward[1]
Date of birth 3 June 1879
Place of birth Kennington, Surrey, England
Date of death 31 January 1954(1954-01-31) (aged 74)[2]
Place of death Ealing, England
Position(s) Centre forward, inside forward
Youth career
Ascham College
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1895–1900 Clacton Town
1900–1901 Harwich & Parkeston
1901 Chelmsford
1901–1909 Tottenham Hotspur 131 (61)
1909 Chelmsford
1909–1915 Chelsea 106 (30)
1919–1920 Clacton Town 6 (4)
International career
1903–1911 England 23 (29)
1906–1914 England Amateurs 30 (44)
1908–1912 Great Britain 6 (5)
Southern League XI
1908–1913 Football League XI 3 (3)
*Club domestic league appearances and goals

Vivian John Woodward (3 June 1879 – 31 January 1954) was an English footballer who enjoyed the peak of his career from the turn of the 20th century to the outbreak of the First World War. He played for Tottenham Hotspur and Chelsea.[3]

He captained Great Britain to gold medals at the 1908 Olympics in London and in Stockholm in 1912. Woodward's tally of 29 goals in 23 matches for England remained a record from 1911 to 1958; his strike rate of 1.26 goals per game is the second highest for an England player.

He served in the British Army during the First World War, and as a result missed out on Chelsea's run to their first-ever FA Cup final in 1915. Woodward's injuries during the war caused his retirement from football.

Club career[edit]

An architect by profession, Woodward began his career at Clacton Town. Following spells at Harwich & Parkeston and Chelmsford, he joined Tottenham Hotspur in 1901,[2] who that year would win the FA Cup.[4] Due to work and cricket commitments, he wouldn't begin to appear regularly for the team until the 1902–03 season.[5] In nine seasons at White Hart Lane, he made 169 appearances and scored 73 goals.[6] Tottenham was elected to the Second Division of the Football League for the 1908–09 season, and Woodward scored Spurs' first ever goal in the Football League in September 1908 against Wolverhampton Wanderers that finished 3–0.[7] He helped the team win promotion to the First Division that season.[8]

Before the start of the 1909 season, Woodward decided to retire to concentrate on his architectural practice and cricket. He had a short spell back with Chelmsford, but was persuaded to join David Calderhead's Chelsea on 20 November 1909. He went on to play in a total of 116 games for them, scoring 34 goals.[5][9][10] He was their leading scorer in the 1912–13 season with ten goals.[11]

At the start of the First World War he enlisted in the British Army and as a result did not play many matches during the 1914–15 season, but he was given special leave to join Chelsea at Old Trafford for the Cup Final when Bob Thomson was injured.[12] However Thomson recovered and Woodward refused to play and deny Thomson his chance to play in an FA Cup final as Woodward had not played in any of Chelsea's matches in their run to the final.[13]

Woodward was injured in the right thigh during the war and did not return to top class football.[5]

International career[edit]

He made his England debut in 1903, scoring twice in a 4–0 win against Ireland. Between 1903 and 1911, he won 23 full caps and scored 29 goals, setting an English record that would last until the 1950s. He also played in three unofficial international matches against South Africa in 1910, scoring a further four goals. At the time, England only usually played three matches a season, for the British Home Championship, but two tours to central Europe in 1908 and 1909 netted Woodward 15 goals (over half his total). He held the overall England goalscoring record, either jointly or alone, for 47 years – longer than any other player until surpassed by Tom Finney in 1958. With his 28th and 29th goals, the last of his career, he overhauled Steve Bloomer against Wales in March 1911, and was not himself overtaken until Tom Finney scored his 30th (and last) goal in October 1958.

He also turned out 44 times for England Amateurs and scored 57 goals, most of them against inferior European teams. In one match against France in 1906, the Times and Sporting Life credit Woodward with eight goals in a 15–0 win, although FIFA's official record of the match credits him with only four goals. However he did score six against Netherlands in 1909. 30 of his amateur appearances and 44 goals were in matches recognized as full internationals by FIFA and the opposition's Football Associations, though not by the FA.

Woodward represented the Football League XI and the Southern League XI.[2] He also toured the United States with The Pilgrims in 1905.[2]

Olympic career[edit]

Woodward was Great Britain captain at the 1908 and 1912 Olympic Games, both of which Great Britain won.[2]

Military career[edit]

He joined the 17th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment.[2] This was one of the Pals battalion formed during the early stages of World War I.[14] It was known as a "Footballers Battalion" and it included many members of Woodward's former team Tottenham Hotspur.[14] He served on the Western Front and was wounded in 1916.[15] He attained the rank of Captain.[2]

Career statistics[edit]

Club[edit]

Appearances and goals by club, season and competition
Club Season League FA Cup Other Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Tottenham Hotspur 1900–01[6] Southern League First Division 1 0 0 0 1[a] 1 2 1
1901–02[6] 2 0 0 0 1[a] 2 3 2
1902–03[6] 12 4 4 3 3[a] 0 19 7
1903–04[6] 17 10 4 1 6[b] 2 27 13
1904–05[6] 20 7 4 0 2[a] 0 26 7
1905–06[6] 12 5 3 1 1[a] 2 16 8
1906–07[6] 20 7 3 0 0 0 23 7
1907–08[6] 20 10 1 0 1[a] 0 22 10
1908–09[6] Second Division 27 18 4 0 31 18
Total 131 61 23 5 15 7 169 73
Chelsea 1909–10[6] First Division 13 5 2 0 15 5
1910–11[6] Second Division 19 6 3 3 22 9
1911–12[6] 14 2 0 0 14 2
1912–13[6] First Division 27 10 3 1 30 11
1913–14[6] 27 4 2 0 29 4
1914–15[6] 6 3 0 0 6 3
Total 106 30 10 4 116 34
Career total 237 91 33 9 15 7 285 107
  1. ^ a b c d e f Appearances in Western League
  2. ^ Five appearances and two goals in Western League, one appearance in London League

International goals[edit]

Sources:[16][17]

England national team
Year Apps Goals
1903 3 4
1904 2 0
1905 3 2
1907 1 0
1908 7 10
1909 5 11
1910 1 0
1911 1 2
Total 23 29
Scores and results of England is listed first and score column indicates the score after each Woodward goal.
List of international goals scored by Vivian Woodward
No. Cap Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition Ref
1 1 14 February 1903 Molineux Stadium, Wolverhampton, England  Ireland
1–0
4–0 1902–03 British Home Championship
2
2–0
3 2 2 March 1903 Fratton Park, Portsmouth, England  Wales
2–1
2–1
4 3 4 April 1903 Bramall Lane, Sheffield, England  Scotland
1–0
1–2
5 7 27 March 1905 Anfield, Liverpool, England  Wales
1–0
3–1 1904–05 British Home Championship
6
3–1
7 10 15 February 1908 Solitude, Belfast, Northern Ireland  Ireland
2–1
3–1 1907–08 British Home Championship
8 11 16 March 1908 Racecourse Ground, Wrexham, Wales  Wales
1–0
7–1
9
6–0
10
7–0
11 13 6 June 1908 Cricketer Platz, Vienna, Austria  Austria
3–0
6–1 Friendly
12 14 8 June 1908 Hohe Warte Stadium, Vienna, Austria
1–0
11–1
13
5–0
14
6–0
15
10–1
16 15 10 June 1908 Millenáris Sporttelep, Budapest, Hungary  Hungary
1–0
7–0
17 17 13 February 1909 Park Avenue, Bradford, England  Ireland
2–0
4–0 1908–09 British Home Championship
18
3–0
19 19 29 May 1909[a] Millenáris Sporttelep, Budapest, Hungary  Hungary
2–0
4–2 Friendly
20
4–2
21 20 31 May 1909
2–0
8–2
22
4–0
23
6–1
24
7–1
25 21 1 June 1909 Hohe Warte Stadium, Vienna, Austria  Austria
1–0
7–1
26
3–0
27
6–1
28 23 13 March 1911 The Den, London, England  Wales
1–0
3–0 1910–11 British Home Championship
29
3–0
  1. ^ Other sources credit England's fourth goal to an own goal from János Weinber, but the official report of the Games and contemporary newspaper reports agree Woodward scored the last goal.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Joyce, Michael (2012). Football League Players' Records 1888 to 1939. Nottingham: Tony Brown. p. 319. ISBN 978-1905891610.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Vivian Woodward | Football and the First World War". Football and the First World War. Archived from the original on 8 May 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  3. ^ "Vivian Woodward". Olympedia. Archived from the original on 24 May 2021. Retrieved 26 March 2021.
  4. ^ A Romance of Football. Tottenham & Edmonton Herald. February 1921. p. 29. Archived from the original on 26 December 2008. Retrieved 11 January 2009.
  5. ^ a b c "Vivian Woodward". Spartacus Educational. Archived from the original on 5 April 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p "Vivian Woodward". 11v11.com. Archived from the original on 27 June 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  7. ^ "'Sir' Vivian – A Spurs Great". Tottenham Hotspur Football Club. 8 September 2015. Archived from the original on 25 June 2017. Retrieved 30 June 2017.
  8. ^ Welch, Julie (2015). "Chapter 5: The Human Chain of Lightning". The Biography of Tottenham Hotspur. Vision Sports Publishing. ISBN 978-1-909534-50-6. Archived from the original on 24 June 2022. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
  9. ^ Glanvill, Rick (2006). Chelsea FC: The Official Biography – The Definitive Story of the First 100 Years. Headline Book Publishing Ltd. p. 410. ISBN 0-7553-1466-2.
  10. ^ "Chelsea Football Club Players Appearances: Vivian John Woodward". bounder.friardale.co.uk. Archived from the original on 1 March 2018. Retrieved 24 June 2018.
  11. ^ Glanvill, Rick (2006). Chelsea FC: The Official Biography – The Definitive Story of the First 100 Years. Headline Book Publishing Ltd. p. 380. ISBN 0-7553-1466-2.
  12. ^ Unknown (1915). Cup Final Programme.
  13. ^ Glanvill, Rick (2006). Chelsea FC: The Official Biography – The Definitive Story of the First 100 Years. Headline Book Publishing Ltd. p. 181. ISBN 0-7553-1466-2.
  14. ^ a b "The Story of the Footballers' Battalions in the First World War". Football and the First World War. Archived from the original on 26 June 2018. Retrieved 26 June 2018.
  15. ^ "Soccer Soldiers". National Army Museum. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007. Retrieved 30 January 2008.
  16. ^ "Vivian John Woodward - International Appearances". RSSSF. 28 January 2021. Archived from the original on 27 August 2014. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  17. ^ "Vivian Woodward". EU-football.info. Archived from the original on 29 June 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  18. ^ "England vs Ireland, 14 February 1903". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 18 January 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  19. ^ "England vs Wales, 2 March 1903". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 3 December 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  20. ^ "England vs Scotland, 4 April 1903". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 21 September 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  21. ^ "England vs Wales, 27 March 1905". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 26 December 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  22. ^ "Ireland vs England, 15 February 1908". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 29 June 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  23. ^ "Wales vs England, 16 March 1908". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 29 June 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  24. ^ "Austria vs England, 6 June 1908". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 26 October 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  25. ^ "Austria vs England, 8 June 1908". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 23 October 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  26. ^ "Hungary vs England, 10 June 1908". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 12 June 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  27. ^ "England vs Ireland, 13 February 1909". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 16 April 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  28. ^ "Hungary 2-4 England, Saturday, 29th May 1909". www.englandstats.com. Archived from the original on 24 December 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  29. ^ "Hungary vs England, 31 May 1909". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 18 January 2022. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  30. ^ "Austria vs England, 1 June 1909". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 23 November 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.
  31. ^ "England vs Wales, 13 March 1911". EU-Football.info. Archived from the original on 26 December 2021. Retrieved 29 June 2022.

Further reading[edit]

  • Jacobs, Norman (1 August 2005). Vivian Woodward: Football's Gentleman. NPI Media Group. ISBN 0-7524-3430-6.

External links[edit]